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November 2020 Election Results: Measure Y was voted on and failed by 56.44% of the total votes. Measure Y:  City of Sonoma, Personal Cannabis Cultivation Initiative Full title of the initiative:  Initiative Measure amending the Municipal Code to permit personal cannabis cultivation on all residential properties and establishment and operation of cannabis businesses within the City,...

The County continues to process a large number of mailed ballots, and the election is not final until the results are certified by the County. Election results will change throughout the canvass period as vote-by-mail ballots, provisional ballots, and other ballots are processed. As of November 6, the "Unofficial Partial Results" for City ballot measures...

Measure V is one of four local ballot measures before voters in the City of Sonoma this election. Sonoma’s Local Sales Tax Sonoma has a voter-approved half-cent (0.50%) local sales tax that helps fund City services.  Sonoma voters first approved this local sales tax in 2012 for five years to preserve City services and help...

Sonoma voters will be able to weigh in on four local ballot measures in the November 2020 election. Three of these measures were placed on the ballot by the City Council, and one by a citizens initiative. Information on each measure, including ballot documents, additional background, and/or frequently asked questions, can be found on the...

For background, visit the Urban Growth Boundary page.  For information about Measure W, including the City Attorney's impartial analysis of the ballot measure, the City Council Resolution,   and other frequently asked questions, visit the Measure W page. General information about the November 3 election can be found at the Elections page.  If you are a...

Measure W would retain the rules of the existing measure which allow the UGB to be enlarged to accommodate affordable housing with a five acre limit each calendar year and a total limit of twenty acres over the 20-year life of the ballot measure. However, instead of requiring that housing projects eligible for this exception...

In 2000, Sonoma voters approved a ballot measure that established in the City’s General Plan a boundary line beyond which urban development was not permitted for twenty years, except under certain circumstances. If approved by a simple majority of voters, Measure W would continue with the existing Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) for another twenty years,...

More information about Measure V, including the ballot materials as well as links to City budget information, can be found on the City’s website at sonomacity.org/ballot-measure-v.  General information about the November 3 election can be found at sonomacity.org/elections.  If you are a member of a community organization that would like to receive a presentation on...

Measure V requires approval by a simple majority of voters in order to pass.

In California cities, under what is known as the “Gann Limit”, a maximum spending amount is established for tax-funded services and adjusted each year. Each year, the City Council adopts a resolution establishing the appropriations limit for the City of Sonoma. This ballot language allows the City to adjust this spending limit in line with...

Measure V would extend the existing local sales tax at the current rate on an ongoing basis until repealed by the voters. This tax could be repealed by voters in the future if placed on the ballot by the City Council or by a citizen initiative.  

All Measure V funds would remain local and be controlled by the City Council.  The primary reason this local sales tax was originally brought to Sonoma voters in 2012 was the State takeaway of millions of dollars in local redevelopment revenue.  By law, locally approved sales taxes cannot be taken away by the State. In...

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